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Winter 2013-2014

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  • Clamp and Glue a Butcher Block Top

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, January 31, 2012
    Clamp and Glue a Butcher Block Top Click here to view more episodes of Chad's gluing and clamping tips! Brought to you by Product information: - Titebond Original Wood Glue - Titebond II Premium Wood Glue - Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue Product...
  • Gluing and Clamping Tips

    by American Woodworker Editors     Wednesday, July 6, 2011
    Episode 5 - Tips for Dealing with Glue Squeeze Out Episode 4 - Tips Gluing and Clamping a Table Top Episode 3 - Tips Gluing and Clamping Outdoor Projects Episode 2: Tips for Gluing and Clamping a Butcher Block Top Episode 1 - Tips for Spreading Glue Brought...
  • Slot Orients T-Bolt

    by American Woodworker Editors     Thursday, September 24, 2009
    Aligning the T-bolts on my router table’s fence with the T-track slots in the table was a hassle. I could never tell which way the T-bolt heads were facing, because they were hidden beneath the fence. To eliminate the guesswork, I sawed a slot in...
  • Solvent Decanter

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    I came up with this 5-ft.-tall decanter to recycle my varnish-contaminated mineral spirits. It’s made from standard plumbing supplies from the local home center (about $50). It holds a gallon of mineral spirits and hangs in a cool, dry place, away...
  • Router Depth Setter

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    This jig makes it easy to set the bit for routing flutes or dadoes. I simply drop the appropriate depth gauge into the channel, set my router on top and lower the bit until it touches the gauge. The base is an 8-in. square piece of 3/4-in. MDF. Two strips...
  • Handheld Featherboard

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    This unusual push stick provides fingertip control without risking your fingertips. Its V-notch end wraps around the board’s edge to hold the workpiece against both the table and the fence, and its flexible tines produce a gripping action. The curved...
  • Switch Safety

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Sliding switches on some of my older power tools make it difficult to tell whether they’re switched on or off. I didn’t think much about it until the time my router started right up when I plugged it in— I had unknowingly switched it...
  • Super Sandpaper

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Whenever I was sanding by hand, the sandpaper would roll or slide in my hands, eventually tearing and turning into small, useless scraps. I tried folding it every which way until I finally solved the problem with a little spray adhesive. Now I cut a sheet...
  • Freshness Date for Finish

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    I never thought about the risks of using finish from an old, previously opened can until I had to entirely strip a project because the ancient varnish I used didn’t dry properly. Now I play it safe. I date every can when I first open it, so I know...
  • Hanging Your Cordless Drills

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    While building this little station to organize my cordless-drill paraphernalia, I discovered that bicycle hooks make great drill holders. Mounting the station on the wall saves valuable benchtop space. Now I never have to hunt for my drills, chargers...
  • Smooth-As-Silk Countersink

    by American Woodworker Editors     Wednesday, September 9, 2009
    Countersink first, drill the pilot hole second. That may sound backward, but it’s the easiest way to ensure a perfectly smooth countersink. I used to drill the pilot hole first on the drill press, but if that hole was relatively large or the wood...
  • Tape Simplifies Gluing Miter Joints

    by American Woodworker Editors     Wednesday, September 9, 2009
    Let’s face it: Gluing mitered frames is a hassle. You need four, five or even six hands—or the time-honored shop staple, masking tape. I like the good, strong blue kind. You’ll need one piece for each corner. Lay the masking tape face...
  • Minimize Router Burns

    by American Woodworker Editors     Wednesday, September 9, 2009
    End grain burns easily on maple and cherry, and those burns are hard to remove. After sanding my fingers to the bone following one particularly unfortunate routing pass, I came up with an easy solution that removes those unsightly burns without requiring...
  • Glue Squeegee

    by American Woodworker Editors     Wednesday, September 9, 2009
    I stack-laminate boards to create turning blanks. Each blank contains numerous laminations, so I have to work fast during assembly. To spread glue quickly and evenly, I use a squeegee designed for silk-screening. You can buy one at an art supply store...
  • Shallow Cut Eliminates Tear-Out

    by American Woodworker Editors     Wednesday, September 9, 2009
    When I crosscut hardwood plywood, I use an old technique to minimize tear-out on the bottom face. I simply make two passes with my general-purpose blade. After setting the rip fence, I cut a shallow groove, no more than 1/32 in. deep. Then I raise the...