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Winter 2013-2014

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  • Long-Reach Stop for Crosscut Sled

    by Tim Johnson     Sunday, February 22, 2009
    I built the “Ultimate Crosscut Sled” featured in AW #75 (October 1999). It works great, and recently I've added an adjustable stop, which makes it even better. I thought other AW readers would be interested in my upgrade. My 50-in.-capacity...
  • Zero Clearance Dust Port

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, June 30, 2009
    Zero clearance inserts are wonderful for eliminating tearout, but unfortunately, they also impede dust collection. To give my collection system an opening to pull sawdust through, I cut a 1/2-in.-dia. hole at the front end of the blade slot. In this location...
  • Tablesaw Jig Clamp

    by AW-Editor     Thursday, January 29, 2009
    I added this hold-down to my tablesaw's sliding cutoff jig and find it a great convenience, because the height of the clamp is easily changed. This clamp uses a standard bar-type caulking gun, cut in half, as shown. The mounting block slides to apply...
  • Clamp-Free Rip Fence

    by AW-Editor     Thursday, January 29, 2009
    After years of fumbling with clamps, I decided there must be a better way to attach featherboards to my tablesaw's rip fence. Two T-tracks screwed to the fence allow me to mount a piece of plywood with a side-mounted track for attaching featherboards...
  • Send us your tool story and you could win cash or a great tool.

    by AW-Editor     Thursday, January 29, 2009
    I really don't need five cordless drills, seven routers or 24 antique hand planes, but I can't help it. I'm a tool nut. Are you? Have you ever bought an old woodworking machine just because it looked cool? Tried a new tool and said, "Wow...
  • Handy Blast Gate Lever

    by Tom Caspar     Friday, February 20, 2009
    Reaching down to open and close my tablesaw's blast gate was a real pain until I built this pivoting mechanical arm from pieces of 1/8-in. flat steel and 3/8-in. rod. It may look cobbled together, but it works great. I drilled holes, fastened the...
  • Double Scrollsaw Blade Life

    by American Woodworker Editors     Thursday, October 15, 2009
    When my scrollsaw blade gets dull, it’s really only dull on the bottom half, because the wood I cut is usually less than 1/2 in. thick. To get more life out of my blade, I made an auxiliary table that raises the workpiece, so I can cut with the...
  • Capture Tablesaw Dust

    by American Woodworker Editors     Monday, November 9, 2009
    My contractor-style tablesaw spewed sawdust everywhere until I enclosed the base by covering all the openings with 1/4-in. MDF panels. First, I added two aluminum angle rails so the collection box slopes toward the dust port in the back panel. Then I...
  • More Visible Scrolling

    by American Woodworker Editors     Thursday, July 22, 2010
    A scrollsaw blade can be tough to see as it goes up and down 1,000 times or more per minute. This can make it hard to follow your line. An easy solution is to spray paint the blades a bright color.
  • Q & A: Sawing Aluminum

    by American Woodworker Editors     Friday, May 3, 2013
    Q & A: Sawing Aluminum Q: Can I cut aluminum with my chop saw? A: Yes.Most carbide blades work fine for occasionally cutting aluminum, but we recommend using a special, non-ferrous metal-cutting blade (about $70) if you cut a lot of aluminum or brass...
  • Q & A: One Step at a Time

    by woodworkerBryan     Monday, June 24, 2013
    Q & A: One Step at a Time Q: ARGH! I cut all the parts according to the cutting list and my face-frame came up short! I worked out the math and the cutting list was correct. What went wrong? A: Rule number one when building complex projects directly...
  • Q & A: Silencing a Squeaky Tablesaw

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, August 27, 2013
    Q & A: Silencing a Squeaky Tablesaw Q: My tablesaw screeches like nails on a chalkboard whenever I adjust the blade.WD-40 made the noise go away for a while, but now it’s back. What do I do? A: That sound can drive you crazy! It’s a clear...
  • Q & A: Should I Run My Tablesaw on 120 or 240 Volts?

    by American Woodworker Editors     Friday, December 13, 2013
    Should I Run My Tablesaw on 120 or 240 Volts? Q: My contractor’s saw pops a breaker every once in a while, and that’s driving me crazy. I noticed that its motor can be wired for either 120 or 240 volts. I don’t have a 240 circuit in...
  • Q & A: How Can I Avoid Kickback When Resawing on a Tablesaw?

    by American Woodworker Editors     Tuesday, December 17, 2013
    How Can I Avoid Kickback When Resawing on a Tablesaw? Q: Is there a splitter that can be used for resawing on a tablesaw? Mine is hooked onto the blade guard so it won’t work. A: It’s unfortunate but true; you can’t use a conventional...
  • Slipping Edges

    by AW-Editor     Thursday, January 29, 2009
    Sharp edges and thin laminates have a way of slipping under the tablesaw fence and ruining a project—or worse. My answer is to lay a piece of 1/4-in. hardboard or plywood up against the fence. A stop at the back prevents the assembly from sliding...