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October 2014


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  • Tom's Torsion Box Workbench

    Tom's Torsion Box Workbench This rock-solid workhorse is simply four easy-to-build 2x4-and-plywood boxes. By Tom Caspar Quick, cheap, solid. You can’t ask much more from a workbench, and this one delivers it all. Made of out nothing more than ordinary construction lumber, this durable, 250-lb. heavyweight has all the features of a master cabinetmaker’s
    Posted to Woodworking Projects (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 08-10-2012
  • Spice Cabinet Secret Drawer

    What's behind the door of Al Hudson's William and Mary Spice Cabinet? A beautifully-proportioned set of small drawers. Behind the drawers, there's a very cleverly designed secret drawer. To access this drawer, you must first remove two drawers from the cabinet. Then you pull on the false divider between them. Neat! This cabinet was featured
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 07-07-2009
  • Shed Doors 6: Hinge Mortises

    Last summer, I added a small shed to my old garage. I hung some temporary plywood doors, and built the real doors in the shop here at American Woodworker. Here are links to the first five parts of the story: Shed Doors 1 and Shed Doors 2 and Shed Doors 3 and Shed Doors 4 and Shed Doors 5. The doors are ready to glue together, but first I have to cut
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 04-26-2009
  • Shed Doors 5: Raised Panels

    Last summer, I added a small shed to my old garage. I hung some temporary plywood doors, and built the real doors in the shop here at American Woodworker. Here are links to the first four parts of the story: Shed Doors 1 and Shed Doors 2 and Shed Doors 3 and Shed Doors 4 . I've made the frames, and now it's on to making the panels. I was lucky
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 04-21-2009
  • Shed Doors 4: Curved Rails

    Last summer, I added a small shed to my old garage. I hung some temporary plywood doors, and built the real doors in the shop here at American Woodworker. Here are links to the first three parts of the story: Shed Doors 1 and Shed Doors 2 and Shed Doors 3 . I've cut the mortises and made the tenons. And the doors go together! Those are moments worth
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 04-13-2009
  • Shed Doors 3: Fitting Tenons

    Last summer, I added a small shed to my old garage. I hung some temporary plywood doors, and built the real doors in the shop here at American Woodworker. Here are links to the first two parts of the story: Shed Doors 1 and Shed Doors 2 . OK, the last step was to check the thickness of the tenons, to make sure they're theoretically correct. They're
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 04-04-2009
  • Shed Doors 2: Big Tenons

    Last summer, I added a small shed to my old garage. I hung some temporary plywood doors, and built the real doors in the shop here at American Woodworker. Here's a link to the first part of the story: Shed Doors 1. I've mortised the stiles, and now it's on to the rails' tenons. Maybe I've got waste on the brain, but I thought I'd
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 03-30-2009
  • Shed Doors 1: Huge Mortises

    I built a shed last summer, as a small addition to my turn-of-the-century one-car garage. I've been a woodworker for umpteen years now, but I've never done any carpentry work before. Go figure. I couldn't resist the challenge of building custom doors for the shed–a pair of tall, skinny ones with frame-and-panel construction. I had
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 03-27-2009
  • Unplugged Woodshop: Some Video!

    If you want a genuine taste of what woodworking was like before power tools, check out this silent film, from 1923, on wooden clog making in Sweden. Amazing! Here's the link: Making Clogs [Many thanks to John W of the local Society of American Period Furniture Makers for passing this on.] -Tom C
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 03-23-2009
  • Ted's Altar 2

    Drawings can only get you so far when you're designing a piece. Sometimes, when I'm stuck, I leave the drawing board and make full-size parts. Here's a sample joint I made before building Ted's Altar. To give you a sense of scale, the top piece is 1-1/2" thick. The stubby leg is 3-1/2" thick from front to back and 3" wide
    Posted to Tom Caspar (Weblog) by Tom Caspar on 03-10-2009
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