Farm Table, September 2000

Three pairs of cauls make gluing the huge top manageable and guarantee that it will be flat.

Don’t worry about chopping mortises or trying to cut tenons on the ends of the 6-ft.-long aprons. With the new BeadLOCK system, all you need for mortise-and-tenon style joinery is a drill and a bit.




CLAMP THE CAULS to the work surface with the top sandwiched between (see Fig. C). Then tighten the pipe clamps, starting at the center and working out to the ends. Remove the glue squeeze-out at the joints after it sets up, but before it hardens. After gluing, trim the long edges with the router and straightedge so they’re straight and parallel.



SQUARE THE END of the top, using a piece of MDF with a factory corner as a template. If you have more than 1/4 in. to remove, use a saw first, to get close. Align one edge of the MDF with the long side of the top. Clamp a block against the opposite edge of the top to avoid blowout. Then trim the edge square, making shallow passes with the pattern-cutting router bit.



TURN THE LEGS from laminated 3-1/2-in. square blanks, using the dimensions from Fig. E, or order the legs through the mail (see Sources, page 77). If you want to turn them yourself, see "Turning Table Legs" on page 42.



MARK REFERENCE LINES for the BeadLOCK jig on the legs and aprons. Offset the centerlines on the leg by the thickness of a credit card. This slightly raises the rail above the top of the leg, allowing you to plane the apron flush after assembly (see Photo 16).




CAULS FOR GLUING THE TOP
THE LOWER CAUL
lifts the top off the pipe and centers it at the pressure point of the clamp. The upper caul is extra wide so it’s stiff enough to hold the top flat as the pipe clamps are tightened.



LEG PROFILE AND DIMENSIONS



EXPLODED VIEW OF LEG AND APRON JOINERY
LOOSE TENONS,
cut from specially made dowel stock, fit scalloped mortises created by the BeadLOCK doweling jig, which adjusts to drill overlapping holes.


Previous Page Next Page

Farm Table Exploded View of Farm Table
What It Takes To Build & Choosing and Using Your Lumber
Steps 4-8 Steps 9-12 Steps 13-18
Steps 19-22 Steps 23-26

Feature Article • Farm Table • October 2000
© 2000 American Woodworker Magazine®